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Showing posts from July, 2017

How to Deal With Anger

Anger is a natural emotion that all but the most at-peace people experience at some point in their lives. You may get angry because of a specific circumstance -- for example, how someone treated you poorly or how you have to deal with too much on a specific day -- or you may deal with anger on a constant basis, the smallest actual or even perceived transgressions sending raw emotion coursing throughout your body. Learn to deal with anger not only for the sake of those around you but for your own health as well.  Step Away When you're faced with a situation that makes you angry, do not let yourself explode. You do not have to force yourself to ignore these feelings, either. Instead, step away for as long as you can; excuse yourself to the restroom for a moment if need be. Take some time to yourself. Close your eyes, and inhale and exhale slowly. Count to 10 with each new breath. This will help diffuse the biological process going on in your body that makes you feel so angry. If po…

CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYEE FOR A FORTUNE 500 COMPANY

Employees who hope to achieve success in a Fortune 500 company benefit from manifesting key skills and attributes. Successful employees understand that they are part of a larger team with a goal of directing efforts toward the accomplishment of the company's mission, vision and values. Doing this effectively requires strong communication skills, the ability to collaborate with colleagues and management and a commitment to working as part of a team.  Communication Skills Communication skills have always been critical for success for employees in organizations of any size. In Fortune 500 companies, these skills become even more critical because of the sheer number and types of audiences that the employee must interact with. Communication skills include both verbal and written communications and incorporate the ability to communicate through electronic channels, including social media. Employees who can focus their communications effectively to consider the target audiences' nee…

Factors Affecting Human Capital

An intangible asset, human capital is the workforce a company employs. Human capital is a combination of employee competencies and their commitment to the organization for which they work. According to University of Chicago professor Gary S. Becker, economists may refer to a workforce as “human capital” because their combination of skills, health, values and knowledge are regarded as an asset.  Competences The abilities an individual has and her capability to expand upon them can help her create a positive gain in human capital. Competences are more than just skills because employees have the power to gain new knowledge and generate new skills with training. The sharing of competencies does not make them scarcer; instead, the opposite effect occurs. For example, a doctor can gain a level of human capital with training and education, but then develops a greater gain in human capital over time with continued practice and experience. In addition to formal education, a worker can increas…

Clinical Social Workers Vs. Mental Health Counselors

Social workers and mental health counselors are both master's level mental health professionals. They work with people in their environments, helping them with, among other things, mental health disorders, problems with living, educational issues and social problems. On the surface, there appears to be little difference between the two professions. But when you take a look at the educational requirements and the fields these professionals work in, there are slight, yet distinct differences.  Education for Clinical Social Workers A clinical social worker, by definition, is a master's level social worker (MSW) who has passed a clinical-licensing exam to earn a state license and has completed a supervised, post-masters client-contact requirement of approximately 3,000 hours. Each state has different guidelines for the number of client hours required to obtain the clinical license. MSW programs are based on a core-competency approach. Emphasis is placed on the student's compe…

Difference Between Teacher Education & Teacher Training

Although people outside the education field may use teacher education and teacher training interchangeably, education theorists distinguish the terms clearly. In the context of teacher preparation, training corresponds to learning real-life classroom skills while education refers to more abstract knowledge about modes of learning and instruction. When referring to the process of preparing future teachers, education specialists find "teacher education" more consistent with the idea of developing versatile, reflective practitioners with a wealth of professional knowledge. TRAINING In education theory, training refers to acquisition of concrete skills for meeting specific goals in a real-life, applied situation. This often includes "closed skills," like typing or juggling, that have absolute ceiling on mastery or where the only way to improve the skill is to do it faster or while multi-tasking. For teachers, training might include how to maintain a grade book or calc…

HOW TO BECOME A NUCLEAR MEDICINE PHYSICIAN

Nuclear medicine physicians are highly trained doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases using radiopharmaceuticals. These are drug cocktails containing radionuclides. When taken by a patient, the drug gets localized and emits radiation that can then be recorded with a camera and projected on a computer screen. Nuclear medicine physicians use the information obtained to evaluate the molecular, physiologic, metabolic and physiologic conditions of the body to make the appropriate decisions in diagnosis, treatment and research. They oversee patient care in this area and serve as consultants to other physicians. To become a nuclear medicine physician, you need the appropriate residency training after your basic medical education. Get the appropriate premed education in college, which includes a year each of physics, biology, organic chemistry, general chemistry and math. You do not have to be an official premed student. Medical schools prefer well-rounded college g…

What Are Kids Learning From Disney Movies?

Disney movies have become a hallmark of children's entertainment because of their enduring themes and values. These movies have mixed imaginative worlds with real-life problems and applications. Each movie's plot and characters are specifically designed to impart an important value to the audience. From classics to modern Disney movies, children could gain a lasting lesson from these movies which they will carry with them to adulthood.  Love and Friendship Disney consistently reinforces these timeless values with every new generation of children. Every few years, Disney creates live action and cartoon movies which portray main problems being solved by the power of love and friendship alone. Other values include teamwork and perseverance against adversity. Examples of movies under this category include classics such as "The Little Mermaid" to re-imagined stories like "The Princess and the Frog." Value of Education Disney has regularly promoted the value of …

HOW MUCH DOES A TALENT AGENT MAKE?

Average Pay and Range The average income of a talent agent was $96,410 a year as of 2013, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The lowest-paid 10 percent earned $29,320 or less. The BLS doesn't give a specific figure for the top 10 percent, reporting only that agents in this group earned at least $187,199 annually. A talent agent's actual pay often depends on the success of the people he represents. Top Industries Most talent agents work for public figures such as athletes and entertainers, the BLS reports. These agents averaged $101,380 a year in 2013. Agents working to promote performing arts, sporting and similar events earned an average of $67,370 annually, while those working for performing arts companies averaged $60,690 per year. High-Paying Locations Among the states, California reported the highest annual incomes for talent agents at an average of $127,930, according to the BLS. Massachusetts was second at an average of $115,400 a year. Among the cities,…

CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYEE FOR A FORTUNE 500 COMPANY

Employees who hope to achieve success in a Fortune 500 company benefit from manifesting key skills and attributes. Successful employees understand that they are part of a larger team with a goal of directing efforts toward the accomplishment of the company's mission, vision and values. Doing this effectively requires strong communication skills, the ability to collaborate with colleagues and management and a commitment to working as part of a team.  Communication Skills Communication skills have always been critical for success for employees in organizations of any size. In Fortune 500 companies, these skills become even more critical because of the sheer number and types of audiences that the employee must interact with. Communication skills include both verbal and written communications and incorporate the ability to communicate through electronic channels, including social media. Employees who can focus their communications effectively to consider the target audiences' nee…

FORENSIC PATHOLOGIST: THE SALARY & BENEFITS

Forensic pathologists experience variations in salaries just as every other career field. Those with the most experience generally have higher salaries than those with less as do those with more education. Various employers pay forensic pathologists different salaries as well, with those working for the federal government having some of the higher salaries.  Experience Forensic pathologists with 10 to 19 years of experience have a salary range of $122,500 to $199,500, according to PayScale.com, while those just beginning with less than one year of experience have a reported range of $10,100 to $122,100. Employer Type Forensic pathologists have the option to work with several different types of employers, each of which may of course operate in a different way. If you’re interested in great benefits, consider working for the government. Both federal and state and local governments employ forensic pathologists. Hospitals and private practices or firms also employ forensic pathologists. …

HOW TO BECOME A GENETICIST

Geneticists and genetic counselors research human genes and chromosomes, and help patients who suffer from conditions caused by genetic abnormalities. Clinical geneticists work in laboratories, perform genetic tests, interpret test results, do research and treat patients. The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics reports that recently hired clinical geneticists earned median annual salaries of $128,000 to $202,500 in 2011. Genetic counselors discuss genetic testing options, offer prevention tools and information about diseases, and provide counseling services to patients. They earned a median income of $56,800 in 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics  Education for Geneticists Clinical geneticists must have a medical degree or doctorate degree to become certified in genetics. Undergraduates should take classes in chemistry, biology, biochemistry or genetics. Continue your education in medical school or pursue a doctorate in human genetics. These graduate degre…

Certification for Geneticists

Dermatologists are doctors who treat conditions that affect the skin, nails and hair. They diagnose and treat genetic skin disorders, diseases such as acne and skin and nail cancer, and cosmetic reactions. Aspiring dermatologists must attend medical school, complete a dermatology residency program and obtain a license to work in their states.   Getting Educated Like most physicians, dermatologists must spend a minimum of 11 years in school. The path begins in undergraduate school where prospective dermatologists must complete a bachelor's degree in physics, biology, math, chemistry or a related field. The next hurdle is to pass the Medical College Admission Test, enroll in medical school and earn either a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathic medicine degree. To qualify as dermatologists, doctors must complete an internship followed by a three-year dermatology residency that covers topics such as dermatopathology, pediatric dermatology, general dermatology and laser and cos…

How to Become a Resource Teacher

Earn a four-year college degree. Resource teachers must complete additional academic requirements before entering the classroom, but earning a college degree is the first step. Desirable undergraduate degree options include childhood development, education or liberal studies. If you’re already sure of a specialization (for example, you’d like to be a resource teacher for history teachers) then completing a four-year college degree in history is acceptable preparation for that role. Complete a teacher certification program. Most programs run between one and two years, depending on part-time or full-time status and whether you’re seeking additional authorizations, such as a bilingual teaching certificate. During the student teaching segment of your certification program, visit with resource teachers on campus to learn about their job responsibilities, techniques for cooperating with traditional teachers and their role on campus. Some resource teachers may be assigned to meet the needs …

Federal Employee Tuition Reimbursement

Federal Workforce Flexibility Act In 2004, President George W. Bush signed the Federal Workforce Flexibility Act, which provides opportunities for and emphasis on federal employee training and development within a particular agency's mission. Each federal agency is responsible for development of training programs to assist in achieving employee educational goals consistent with its mission. These programs and goals may include skill set and technical training, seminars and workshops, leadership and management training and fellowships. Such training and programs work under either a tuition assistance or tuition reimbursement basis. Program Location Programs for federal employees eligible for tuition assistance or reimbursement may be held at post-secondary institutions of higher learning near the the employee's work site or conducted on-the-job or at the actual work site. Although "federal government" brings to mind Washington, D.C., only 15 percent of the country…