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Showing posts from August, 2013

How to Make a Model Satellite

Step 1 With mostly recycled materials like bottle caps and cardboard and some craft supplies, you can create a model satellite. Please see the last slide for an itemized list of tools and materials. Step 2 Start by spray painting a collection of caps, toothpicks and recycled cardboard (such as a cereal box) either silver or gold. The collection here consists of 1 baby food jar lid, 1 bottle cap, and 3 toothpicks. The cardboard is cut into 2 strips each measuring 1 ½ inches by 6 inches. Your collection can consist of other recycled caps. You can make the caps two-toned by spraying the insides with gold first, and the outsides silver. Allow to dry for 20 minutes. Step 3 Using a gold leafing kit, gold leaf a small cardboard box such as a recycled halogen light bulb box (pictured). A square box is best, but not necessary. This one is 3 inches by 3 inches. You could also use a tea box, juice box or even a toilet paper roll cut in half. Every gold leafing kit is different. Follow your brands&…

How to Make a Musical Instrument for a Science Project

If you are considering making a musical instrument for a science project, you might want to try making a homemade bugle. The way in which you can produce various pitches with this "instrument" resembles the mechanics of actual instruments in the brass family. Making a bugle is a fun project that only requires a few materials and is relatively simple to construct. Things You'll Need Water hose Duct tape Plastic funnel Trumpet mouthpiece (optional) Art supplies (markers, stickers, paint) Cut off one of the ends of the water hose. Make another cut all the way through the hose about 30 inches from the first cut. Double the section of hose you cut so that it forms a loop with a few inches of hose sticking off either end. Wrap some duct tape around the top of the loop (where the hose crosses itself) to secure the hose in this shape. Place a plastic funnel into one end of the water hose and tape it with duct tape to secure it. This will serve as the "bell" of the bugl…

How to Make a Periodic Table Science Presentation

Are you interested in making a periodic table science presentation? Learn how to make a great science fair project from our science presentation expert in this free video clip series. Series Summary Science class may not have been your favorite subject in school, but science is incredibly important. In the major research universities of the United States, deans and trustees increasingly fund the sciences, including medicine and mathematics. The beginning of this infectious topic returns us to our younger years and the annual once a year science fair. Remember cramming to get your project done, only to find that your volcano wouldn't erupt? After watching a few simple science fair presentation videos from our expert Fiona Linke you'll be answering your own cosmic questions. If you're looking for a quick and simple presentation that you can present at the science fair, then look no further. In this video series you'll learn how to make a periodic table science presentat…

Science Project: Do Taller People Run Faster?

Factors in Running A person's height does have an effect on how fast they can run. A study published in the "International Journal of Sports Medicine" in 2006, however, notes that height is only a small factor in running speed. Other more important factors include body conditions such as weight, physical strength and how muscular they are. Running speed also depends on the type of running; short distances require bursts of energy and long strides, while long distances or marathon running require more endurance and physical strength. The running environment -- including wind speeds, temperature and type of surface -- makes a difference in speed as well. Stride and Running Speed Running speed is the product of stride length times stride frequency. Stride length is the distance a runner can place one foot in front of the other; hence a tall person will typically have a longer stride length. Stride frequency is the number of stride per unit of time, or how fast the runner c…

The Science of Making Lipstick

Learn what gives lipstick its shape. The base of lipstick is a natural wax like beeswax or canuba wax. Scientifically wax is a type of lipid that is nearly identical to fat, however, it doesn’t have triglyerceride esters of glycerin. This element gives lipstick is texture and stable shape. Wax is used as a based because it is moldable, it is not water soluble and because it has a high melting point of 113 degrees F. The traditional lipstick shape is created by melting and mixing wax with other components and pouring it into a plastic mold. When the wax cools the lipstick solidifies and it can then be packaged. Understand why emollients are used in the manufacturing of lipsticks. An emollient is an element that is added to a beauty product, like a lipstick, to soften or repair damaged skin. Emollients are sometimes referred to as a moisturizer. One common emollient that is added to lipsticks is castor oil.
Add color to your lipstick with pigments. Pigments are color particles that are…

HOW TO BECOME A SCIENTIST

Take science classes in high school. Statistics, earth sciences (biology and geography, in particular) and computer science are especially helpful. Languages are also a commodity, especially Latin and German. Study your personality. Science requires dedicated attention, the capacity to concentrate despite the surroundings and the ability to process thoughts and experiences quickly. It also requires the ability to work independently, sometimes without guidance and often in isolated surroundings. Choose a specialty that you like. Chemistry, physics and mathematics are the largest areas of study for scientists, but it is also possible to specialize in astronomy or biology, depending on what you want to pursue later. The sooner you choose a field, however, the more accurate your choice of subjects will be, even in college. Get a bachelor’s degree in your chosen field. This is the minimum requirement for most employment at research facilities, although many also require a master’s degree …

How to Request a Research Interview

Whether you're writing a scholarly article, a thesis, a book or a piece for a publication, you may need to conduct some of your research with interviews. Requesting an interview for research purposes can be intimidating, as you are asking that someone devote their time to help you. Going to the trouble of conducting these interviews will serve to validate the information in your work and help further your reputation as a professional and expert in your field.
Request an Interview by Letter or Email Open with a formal salutation that greets the individual by name, using the appropriate prefix or honorific (i.e., "Dear Mr. Brown"). Write a brief introductory paragraph explaining who you are and how how you got the recipient's name (by reputation, a reference, a website). Write the body of the letter, explaining that you wish to interview the recipient for research purposes. Explain in one to two sentences the purpose of the interview and what type of information you a…

How to Write a Personal Contribution Statement

When writing a personal contribution statement, remember that you are, in essence, selling yourself to the university or institution to which you are applying. This essay is about you, first and foremost—what makes you different, what makes you stand out, and most importantly, why the person reading your essay should choose you instead of someone else. Brainstorm. This is the most important part of the writing process for the personal contribution essay. Think about yourself objectively. Ask yourself questions about your interests, intentions, experience, accomplishments, goals, and field of study and its impact on your life. Take notes while you are thinking over these questions. Identify something for which you are passionate, and not what you think will impress people, and think about how you can contribute this passion. Create a thesis of sorts. It des not have to be a traditional thesis, but you want the entire essay to be in support of the thesis, or you. Use your brainstorming…

Aviation Research Paper Topics

Aviation is a huge field with myriad statistics and data. Even if you are not a pilot, aircraft owner, or mechanic, there is something in the aviation industry that affects you. There are many sub-fields in aviation that make for research paper topics, including air travel safety, impact on rural economy, health and fuel costs. Air Travel Safety Obsession about air travel safety is nothing new. Statistics are used to convince people to fly who may otherwise be afraid or cautious. Comparing general aviation and commercial aviation safety to the safety of other modes of transportation can easily fill a research paper. Consider that you are more likely to be injured on a short drive to the airport than you would be flying cross-country, and use this statistic to write a research paper. Rural Economy Rural economy is a topic not often touched on in aviation research. Many small, rural towns still rely on aviation for express packages, supplies and even medical transportation. As the econ…

How to Write a Report on a Piece of Art

"Art:" It’s a subjective form of creation that defies definition and eludes specificity. Using these tips, however, you’ll trade the dread of a daunting task for a place of respect among those infamous art snobs. Thinking about Art Contemplate the art, and formulate a thesis or argument. “What distinguishes Art History papers from the papers you might be asked to write in other courses? Perhaps the biggest difference creates the biggest challenge: in Art History papers, you must be able to create an argument about what you see. In short, you have to translate the visual into the verbal.” ~ Karen Gocsik, Dartmouth College Gocsik accurately articulates the essence of reviewing and critiquing art in her description of how to write an Art History paper. The purpose of an art review is to not only descriptively analyze the piece, but also to posit a thesis and thoroughly support the claim with details from the art’s physical form as well as context. Choose an artwork to analyze. …

How to Write Measurements in a Formal Paper

When you're writing a formal paper for school or work, you need to format measurements in the text using a specific method. The method of formatting measurements should fit with the formal content of the rest of the paper. Write measurements in a formal paper using the specific rules set forth in the AP style guide. Use numerals for all measurements of weight and distance, regardless of the value of the number. If you write the number "7" in a formal paper, spell out "seven" because the number is less than 10. However, when "7" is a measurement, use the numeral and not the spelled-out word. Type a space followed by the unit of measure. For example, if you are writing a paper about the height of a chair, write, "The chair was 4 feet in height." Place a hyphen in between the number and unit of measure if the measurement is modifying an object. For example, if your sentence is formatted, "The [measurement] [object]...", write "T…